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Pittsburgh Injury Law Blog

Electricity helps us, but has the power to hurt too

Electricity makes our modern society, with its many conveniences, possible. Without electricity, we would not be able to light our homes, businesses and streets efficiently. Electricity makes it possible to send and receive information around the world, via our computers, phones and mass media such as television and radio.

But if not properly contained, electricity can be very hazardous to the human body. Consumer products cause thousands of shock injuries each year, the Electrical Safety Foundation International reports. Worst of all is when electrical current causes an electrocution, or fatal shock. On average, 60 people are electrocuted by products annually.

Part Three: What To Do In Case of a Road Trip Accident

Our last post covered a variety of topics related to safety during your road trip. However, no matter how vigilant you are and how closely you adhere to safety guidelines, sometimes accidents are unavoidable and inevitable.

That's why this week's post covers what to do if you are involved in an accident during your road trip.

•· The first thing you should ever do in case of an accident is to make sure that everyone is okay. Your personal wellbeing and the physical wellbeing of your family is of the utmost priority. Check on all passengers for any physical injuries, and be especially aware of children who, though they may not be physically injured, may be scared and need to be comforted. If anyone (including yourself) is injured, call 911 right away. If you were involved in an accident with another vehicle, it's a good idea to check on the driver and passengers in that vehicle as well, in case someone needs assistance and is unable to call for help themselves.

Part Three: What To Do In Case of a Road Trip Accident

Our last post covered a variety of topics related to safety during your road trip. However, no matter how vigilant you are and how closely you adhere to safety guidelines, sometimes accidents are unavoidable and inevitable.

That's why this week's post covers what to do if you are involved in an accident during your road trip.

•· The first thing you should ever do in case of an accident is to make sure that everyone is okay. Your personal wellbeing and the physical wellbeing of your family is of the utmost priority. Check on all passengers for any physical injuries, and be especially aware of children who, though they may not be physically injured, may be scared and need to be comforted. If anyone (including yourself) is injured, call 911 right away. If you were involved in an accident with another vehicle, it's a good idea to check on the driver and passengers in that vehicle as well, in case someone needs assistance and is unable to call for help themselves.

Newer Model Cars also Affected by Takata Airbag Recall

The deadly Takata airbags have caused over 20 million cars to be recalled. The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) has just reported that Takata has told auto-manufactures that even newer model vehicles may also be affected.

According to federal safety regulators, the age of the airbags was believed to be one of the main contributing factors that were making them explode. The recall mainly affected model cars that were manufactured in 2008 and older

How can I get whiplash in a car accident?

Not every type of injury the human can endure is obvious from the outside, but that does not make them any less real, painful or debilitating. Whiplash is a good example.

When a car gets into a collision, the people inside are often thrown rapidly back and forth. This “whipping” of the neck is where the term “whiplash injury” comes from. Whiplash can also occur on the sports field or because of violence.

Bicyclist Struck and Killed by Vehicle in Wilkinsburg

On January 25, 2016, a 55-year-old man was struck and killed while riding his bicycle in Wilkinsburg, near the city of Pittsburgh. The accident occurred around 6:30 p.m. in the eastbound lanes of the 400 block on Ardmore Boulevard.

Police report that the driver, a 23-year-old woman, struck the man on his bicycle while she was on her way home from work. She stopped and stayed at the scene until emergency responders arrived.

How common are road rage car crashes?

Readers who have experienced road rage know how scary it is. Perhaps a driver behind them began tailgating and honking his or her horn. Or maybe a driver made threatening gestures or used abusive language for some perceived slight. In the most extreme cases, drivers in the midst of road rage use their vehicle as a weapon to run their victim off the road or even crash into them on purpose.

Fortunately, such incidents are still fairly rare in the Pittsburgh area, and most drivers are polite and considerate most of the time. But lesser incidents are all too common. In Canada, a nation hardly stereotyped as being rude or aggressive, one out of three people are the victims of road rage at least once a month, according to the CBC. And it is believed that 80 percent of Canadians will experience road rage at least once in their lives.

Takata CEO to offer to resign over defective airbags

Ever since it came to light that airbags made by Japanese manufacturer Takada Corp contained a deadly defect, several automakers have refused to use the company’s products any longer. Now, perhaps in an effort to win back their business, Takata’s CEO will reportedly offer to resign.

Reuters reports that Shigehisa Takada, the grandson of the company’s founder, will make the offer during a meeting with auto companies on Jan. 29, along with other Takata executives. The resignations would be part of a business plan the company will present at the meeting. Sources do not indicate whether Takada has named a potential successor, should he quit.

Brain trauma: the 'invisible' injury

When someone has broken their leg, their condition is obvious to any observer. They probably have a cast on the leg and need crutches to get around until the bone heals. But a traumatic brain injury is rarely so easy to see. This is why many people living with TBI in Pittsburgh say their condition is “invisible.”

Though their injury is causing them terrible, ongoing symptoms, outsiders, even well-meaning friends and relatives, do not understand what is going on. Strangers may get impatient or rude when someone with a TBI is struggling with everyday tasks.

Winter Travel Safety Series Part Two: Winter Road Trip Safety (On The Road)

Our last post covered the things you should do to prepare ahead of time for your winter road trip. This post will provide you with helpful safety tips and guidelines for the road trip itself.

  • Don't drive distracted. There are a variety of things that have the potential to distract drivers from the road during a road trip. Some of them are controllable (radio volume, for example), while some of them are less easily managed (e.g. a crying infant). But taking charge over the distractions that you can control will make your road trip significantly safer. First, remember to never ever use a cell phone while driving. That means no texting, obviously, but according to the National Safety Council, talking on a cell phone while driving is also extremely dangerous, even if you're using a hands-free device. Likewise, if you are using a navigation app on your phone or a separate GPS, keep it out of your hands and out of the way. If you have no passengers, you can secure the device in an easily viewable area on your dashboard, but you should never try to make route changes or perform searches while driving. If possible, you should have a designated trip "navigator" and this individual can be in charge of the GPS while on the road.

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